Our Master of Education in Trauma-Informed Education Degree Program

Available:
Online Program

Next Start Date: 
August 24, 2020

The Master of Education in Trauma-Informed Education will provide candidates with an understanding of how childhood trauma, mental health, and poverty impact students’ ability to learn. Candidates will also be equipped to establish trauma-sensitive practices in their classrooms to promote changes both school-wide and district-wide.  

Historically, educators and social workers train separately and do not have opportunities to collaborate and learn how both professions impact one another. Current nationwide statistics show an increase in the prevalence of childhood trauma, mental illness, and poverty rates in PreK-12th grade. The MEd in Trauma-Informed Education blends education and the helping professions to prepare educators, school counselors, administrators, and daycare workers for the diverse needs of students. 

Highlights

  • Learn about childhood trauma and how it can impact brain development, learning, and behavior regulation.
  • Learn about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, and the implications for learning and long-term effects on America’s students. 
  • Learn about attachment and psychological disorders in children and adolescents and their impact in classroom settings.
  • Learn about the effects poverty may have on learning and how educators can create safe and supportive environments. 

100% Online Program

  • Degree may be completed within one year.
  • 100% online classes can be accessed anywhere, anytime.
  • The cost is $480 per graduate credit hour. All courses are 3 semester hours except Action Research (4).
  • Designed to accommodate full-time working professionals.
  • Prepare students to adapt and succeed in a rapidly growing field.

Areas of Study

Course Requirements

Master of Education in Trauma Informed Education

  • EDU 500—Overview of Childhood Trauma | 3sh
  • EDU 505—Trauma-Informed Practices in Education | 3sh
  • EDU 510—Mental Health Informed Practices in Education | 3sh
  • EDU 515—Living in Poverty | 3sh
  • EDU 787—Action Research I | 3-4sh
  • SOWK/EDU 520—Social-Emotional Learning | 3sh
  • SOWK 505—Mental Health: Children, Adolescents, and Teens | 3sh
  • SOWK 510—Impact of Society and Technology in Children and Adolescents | 3sh
  • SOWK 500—Child Welfare | 3sh
  • SOWK 525—Home, Community, and Classroom Partnerships | 3sh
Major Course Descriptions 

EDU 500—Overview of Childhood Trauma | 3sh

This course is a comprehensive overview of childhood trauma to include types and categories of trauma, responses to trauma, long-term effects of childhood trauma, and established brain pathways. Students will also reflect on how their own stressors and trauma impact their classrooms.

EDU 505—Trauma-Informed Practices in Education  | 3sh

This course is an overview of how trauma looks in the classroom. Students will learn how to look beyond the behavior to find and treat the stressor instead of using traditional consequences.  Students will apply trauma-informed practices to case studies as well as their own classrooms to improve discipline policies, student resilience, and educational outcomes.  

EDU 510—Mental Health Informed Practices in Education  | 3sh

This course is an overview of how mental health illnesses present themselves in children and adolescents in K-12 classrooms. Students will learn interventions and strategies to help their students find success in the educational setting while living with a mental illness. 

EDU 515—Living in Poverty  | 3sh

This course will examine theories of the culture of poverty and how certain populations, especially children, are impacted.  

EDU 787—Action Research I  | 3-4sh

During this course, candidates will develop the research methodology, gather data, and finalize their literature review. (Mandatory Pass/Fail) 

SOWK/EDU 520—Social-Emotional Learning  | 3sh

Students will define social-emotional learning and evaluate assessments of social-emotional skills to determine the best interventions to implement through classroom instruction. Students will determine which interventions are best to enhance student learning and develop social interactions, self-awareness, and self-regulation. 

SOWK 505—Mental Health: Children, Adolescents, and Teens

This is a graduate-level overview of common child and adolescent psychopathologies, such as autism, ADHD, anxiety and depression, and eating disorders as well as the impact of attachment styles.   Attention is given to the impact of these conditions on school attendance, performance, and engagement. Major learning components include the understanding of epidemiology, etiology, accompanying characteristics, and relevant diagnostic criteria for the various disorders. 

SOWK 510—Impact of Society and Technology in Children and Adolescents | 3sh

This course will examine the adaptive and maladaptive effects of media (e.g., television, movies, video games, social media) on the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development of youth, considering the protective role of parents, teachers, ethics and policy.  

SOWK 500—Child Welfare | 3sh

This course will focus on helping students to understand the complex family systems where the effects of child maltreatment are the presenting problems, and the impact of these problems on school attendance, involvement, and performance. This is an advanced human behavior in the social environment, focusing on theory and complex family systems where the effects of child maltreatment are the presenting problems and the manner in which these problems manifest in the school setting. The major types of child maltreatment will be defined, described, and discussed. 

SOWK 525—Home, Community, and Classroom Partnerships | 3sh

This course is designed to familiarize educational providers with essential attitudes, approaches, and actions necessary to form successful family-school-community partnerships that can foster development and learning, especially for children with disabilities. Ecological family systems and family-centered theory and principles serve as the foundation for working collaboratively with families from diverse cultural and social backgrounds within school and community settings.